Weapons of Mass Deception Goes Beyond the News – Why You Should Totally Avoid MSM

No sure, but I want to say this is narrated by Sharyl Attkisson. “Yes, there are now more stations and media voices, but they are all coming from the same ventriloquist….” Have never heard it put ever so succinctly. This is an older video, however, that only makes today even more of what you are about to see than less.

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Pearl Harbor: Why Hawaii Was Surprised and FDR Was Not

Posted by James Perloff in The New American

On Sunday, December 7, 1941, Japan launched a sneak attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor, shattering the peace of a beautiful Hawaiian morning and leaving much of the fleet broken and burning.

The destruction and death that the Japanese military visited upon Pearl Harbor that day — 18 naval vessels (including eight battleships) sunk or heavily damaged, 188 planes destroyed, over 2,000 servicemen killed — were exacerbated by the fact that American commanders in Hawaii were caught by surprise.

But that was not the case in Washington.

Comprehensive research has shown not only that Washington knew in advance of the attack, but that it deliberately withheld its foreknowledge from our commanders in Hawaii in the hope that the “surprise” attack would catapult the U.S. into World War II.

Oliver Lyttleton, British Minister of Production, stated in 1944: “Japan was provoked into attacking America at Pearl Harbor. It is a travesty of history to say that America was forced into the war.”

Although FDR desired to directly involve the United States in the Second World War, his intentions sharply contradicted his public pronouncements.

A pre-war Gallup poll showed 88 percent of Americans opposed U.S. involvement in the European war.

Citizens realized that U.S. participation in World War I had not made a better world, and in a 1940 (election-year) speech, Roosevelt typically stated: “I have said this before, but I shall say it again and again and again: Your boys are not going to be sent into any foreign wars.”

But privately, the president planned the opposite.

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The First Thanksgiving Proclamation

George Washington, in the first year of his first term, proclaimed a day of thanksgiving be all the people of the United States. As you read this, ask yourself, “When was the last time a President spoke this freely and decisively?” Do note that our nation’s capital had yet to be formed and at the time of this proclamation, was in New York City.

A copy of this proclamation was sent to the executives of the States by the President in a brief form letter (October 3). This form is recorded in the “Letter Book” in the Washington Papers.

City of New York, October 3, 1789.

Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor, and Whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me “to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanks-giving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.”

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1876 – Our 1st 100 Years as the United States of America

Quick note about this post — there is a short and long version of U.S. history in this post for

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How (and Why) Hiroshima and Nagasaki Were Selected

With the 70th anniversary of the use of the first atomic bombs coming up (August 6th and 9th for those

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From Whence We Came: Who Encouraged, Educated, Mentored Our Founding Fathers?

56 signatures… Placing 56 families into a commitment they had to win — or face imminent death…. 56 signatures on the

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